Category Archives: Storytelling

Storytelling for Video: How to Create Authentic, Consistent and Value Driven Content [updated February 2019]

FROM EVERYDAY TO BUSINESS STORYTELLING

We tell stories, we invent stories, we share stories, and we make stories up. It’s how we communicate and relate to each other on a daily basis.

So, why are so many business owners petrified of telling their company’s story on video? We’re just sharing what we’re up to, right?

This is what gets in the way:

  • Overthinking the story
  • Cramming too much information and detail into ONE message
  • Getting tangled up in industry jargon
  • Talking about concepts rather than sharing stories
  • Being attached to looking good, rather than being real, like-able, and authentic
  • Packing too much content into one video
  • So, how do you remedy being stuck on telling your story on video?

    1. Be clear on what you are saying to your audience

    This is where your previous work determining your audience and your strategy come in handy – if you have a no clue what I’m talking about – read our “Video Marketing Strategy” blog post.

    At which step in the buying cycle are you addressing your audience? What do you want your audience to do when they finish watching the video?

    Your video marketing storytelling should lead to a single goal. Which is yours?

    • Are you introducing your company and your motivation for what you do?
    • Are you offering a time-sensitive special?
    • Are you explaining a new feature or product and why it is superior to your competitor’s?

    2. Create VALUE with each communication you put out there​

    Even if your video isn’t “teaching” something, make sure your video has depth and resonance. Give your viewers a chance to connect with you and what you stand for (or what you sell).

    If you’re selling a product, show the product while you tell the story about why you are selling it.

    If you’re selling a service, then you are the product! People are buying working with you. Show them the product: You! And, tell them your story.

    3. Plan to your strengths

    I have a writer friend Michael Katz, who insists on doing screen-recordings and voice-over. That’s his thing. I think he would look great on-camera, but he’s chosen that style because it plays to his strengths and admittedly, he does have a great voice.

    Most of my clients are service providers and when they ask me what kind of story to tell, I recommend a couple kinds:

    The Classic: This is my passion, and this is my business
    Chances are, that you have the content for that video already. It’s what you talk about when you meet new people and introduce yourself. Here is mine:

    Expert Tip Series
    I love this kind of video for a small business, especially if you are a service provider. If you sell a product you can even do a tip series on that product: How to take care of it, use it, and work with it. Or you can talk about something related to the product.

    For instance, I did a 22-video series for Clock Wise Productions called “Nina’s Top Tips to Survive DIY Video Marketing“. Here the first video in that series:

    I was hugely worried about coming up with content, but once I found a chapter structure for the 22 videos, it was so easy to come up with expert tips, because I’m passionate about sharing my knowledge and helping small business owners and I’ve been doing this for a while (decades…).

    YOUR AUTHENTICITY IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN PRODUCTION VALUE

    Over the years, I’ve looked at hundreds and hundreds of videos produced by fellow small business owners and “internet sensations” and what good videos have in common isn’t that they are perfectly produced, but rather that they have a sense of authenticity.

    The most successful videos display energy, personality, sincerity, and a value proposition that resonates.

    Keep in mind that even the most authentic videos will inevitably have their critics. You cannot please everyone, there will be those who are attracted to your (video) personality and those who are not.

    When digital marketing and social media giant Gary Vee speaks, some people just roll their eyes and others soak up each word. He has a huge following. Why? He puts out great value with each piece of communication AND he’s got a personality to boot.

    Then there’s the incomparable Casey Neistat, filmmaker and YouTube sensation. Casey’s Mega Vlogs fun, sometimes messy, and – although casual on the surface – very well produced. He’s real, authentic, energetic, and mesmerizing to watch.

    And not everybody has a bubbly personality. Some quieter voices, like Roberto Blake will appeal to a different set of viewers and maybe at a different scale, but they are still out there and getting traction. I like that Roberto offers reliable, and solid advice on all things digital creation. He has a consistent, quiet but engaging way of roping you into his world. And his channel is growing by the day.

     When I started with my own video marketing efforts it took me a moment to catch on. I originally produced “perfect” videos with backdrops and teleprompter and it took me a day and a nervous-breakdown to shoot two short videos.

    Then I started to shoot my own Vlog (video blog) with my iPhone, unscripted (but prepared!), casually sitting at my desk, no lights (just daylight from a window), and guess what! I got feedback, I go reactions, I got clients… Because I was authentic, myself and natural.

    WHEN CREATING YOUR SCRIPT, KEEP TO THE POINT

    Scripting is the hardest part of the video marketing journey to get right and unfortunately, it’s the part you need to nail for the rest to fall into place, especially when it comes to storytelling for video.

    I asked my friend, playwright, and corporate scriptwriter Joni Fritz (her clients include AT&T, Johnson & Johnson, and USA Networks) about what she focuses on when writing for corporate video. She explained:

    “Print and video are definitely two different animals.

    I find when I’m writing narration for video, my sentences are shorter and more dramatic. I get to the point faster. I read everything aloud to make sure it flows off my tongue easily.

    Print can be easier and free-flowing. Longer sentences with more description. With video, I’m always trying to make things sharp and concise.”

    The hardest part is finding the balance between telling a compelling story and keeping it moving. When talking to someone in person, I like to lengthen or shorten a story as needed, taking cues from my listener’s body language.

    But when it comes to video, you have no feedback loop and so it’s best to keep things short and to the point.

    When I write a script for my videos – and I RARELY write scripts – I read them out loud about 10-15 times to make sure they sound “real” even after a lot of repetition. I often cut more than half of my text out and still get the message across. 

    For my expert-tip-series I have up to three (no more!) talking points on one topic (and a narrow topic at that!) and I will shoot as many times as it takes until I say it “perfectly”. Why? It saves me headache and time in editing.

    And, consider this: On social media, or your website, no one wants to watch a video that’s longer than 90 seconds, and you need continuous content, so make what you have to share into as short as possible single pieces to give you more videos to put out there: Win-win!

    I did that with my 22-video series Nina’s Top Tips to Survive DIY Video Marketing“. Here the link again:

    CONSIDER: SHOULD YOU HIRE A COPYWRITER?

    We all write – most of us actually quite a lot, between emails, newsletters, content creation, text messages, and social media posts.

    As we search for our business’ stories and best ways to share them, I wanted to call attention to the mechanism of actually WRITING down those stories. My advice has always been that there are two positions to consider filling with professionals even if you’re totally bootstrapping your video marketing efforts. One of them is a creative helper, a CD (creative director) sometimes known as a copywriter.

    I once hired a company out of London called Creative Copywriter to help me with some of my writing for the website and two introduction videos.

    Although I do all my own writing when it comes to content creation (blog entries, email marketing, and workshops), I felt that the website and the marketing videos needed a copywriter for several reasons:

    • Writing short-form copy is hard and when you are selling with CTAs (call to actions) you need to be very precise in your communication.
    • I was too close to my own material to see what potential customers would understand and what would make them seek more information about my business. A fresh set of eyes, or a fresh brain was very helpful.
    • I had been putting off working on my home-page for far too long, so hiring and paying a writer was going to be my ticket to end that procrastination.

    But, with every “pro” list, come a few “cons”. To make sure your “cons” list remains super short, here a few things to look out for when hiring a copywriter:

    1. First and foremost: Writing for video is a specialty skill. Make sure you hire a writer who has experience and ask for completed video samples. If you don’t love them, don’t hire them.
    2. Allow enough time (and budget) for a copywriter to get to know you and your business.
    3. To speed up the process, hire a copywriter who either has experience writing for your niche, or is your target audience.
    4. Don’t be shy to interview several copywriters. If you go with a company over a freelancer, make sure you interview the writer who will be assigned to you before you make a commitment.
    5. Set enough of your time aside to go through what the copywriter has written and give detailed and extensive feedback. Having someone else write for you is not necessarily a time-savings. It’s an outsourcing of skill, not time.
    6. Similarly, allow enough of your time to write a full brief to make sure your writer knows where to go with his or her copy.
    7. Finally, don’t be shy to redirect a writer. They want and need your feedback to do their job well, so tell them what works and what doesn’t.
    8. Let the copy ‘marinate’ a bit. I like to sit on it for a few hours, or even a day or two to let it sink in. You might very well have some ideas or feedback that needs time to emerge.

    FINALLY, PLAN TO KEEP YOUR CONTENT CONTINUOUS & CONSISTENT

    If you want REAL success with your video marketing, make a commitment to be consistent and publish continuously.

    Consistent content will make you part of your prospects or existing clients life – you publish reliably and consistently, and they will share your content, recommend you, and when they’re ready to buy, you will be at the top of their minds.

    Continuous content will give your prospect something to come back to and continuously learn from you. Be that reliable source with great advice, funny anecdotes, or fast tips. Be that expert voice and show them why they would absolutely want to work with you.

    For example, Susan Combs, CEO of Combs & Company, has an extensive video library; from CEO interviews, to white board explainers, and meeting coverage.

    (Note: The following video is from 2015 – do NOT spend 14 seconds on graphics upfront, go right into the meat of things – you only have 3(!!!) seconds to catch your audience’s attention).)

    What’s interesting is, that she has all her video series bulk-produced. This not only saves time and money, it also gives the videos a look-, tone-, and content continuity that speaks to the commitment she has made to becoming a likable expert in her field.

    It’s sets her apart from her competition, opens doors far beyond pulling in additional leads. Have a look at her different video series and you’ll get the picture.

    Of course, there are many different styles of videos out there. Not all of them are “talking-heads”. You might want or need a different style video for your business.  Here a few fun examples:

    Giaco Whatever: “I make things” is his tag-line. He creates really awesome to-do videos – consistently, and it pays off: He’s super close to 500K followers!

    Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYH-XXUE2QDaWKvABsWJh8w


    Upgrade to 1st class documented by Casey Neistat: Hysterical: And don’t be fooled – it’s expertly shot and edited.


    Liz Benny: DIY, super easy to reproduce. Just images, footage, music. “KAPOW” as Liz would say


    Quynh & Jeff Hunter: Super DIY, down-and-dirty but effective

    At the end of the day, storytelling is always going to be the hardest part of video marketing, and we often make our lives harder than need be.

    Follow the advice above and you’ll be well on your way to great storytelling for your business.

    To end this post, here is short video giving you my top advice when it comes to telling YOUR STORY:

    The Story About Storytelling

    Storytelling is as old as language.

    We tell stories, we invent stories, we share stories, and we make stories up. Some stories are small others epic, but they all are a constant in our everyday lives.

    So, why are so many business owners petrified of corporate storytelling, especially when it comes to video marketing?

    We’re just sharing what we’re up to, right?

    This is what gets in the way:

    • Overthinking the storytelling process
    • Getting tangled up in industry jargon
    • Talking about concepts rather than telling a story
    • Being attached to looking good, rather than real, like-able, and authentic – there, I used the “a” word
    • Trying to pack too many stories into one video

    And the list goes on.

    So, how do you remedy being stuck on telling your story on video?

    If you’re selling a product, show the product while you tell the story about why you are selling it.

    If you’re selling a service, you are the product! People are buying working with you.

    Show them the product: You! And, tell them your story.

    Most of my clients are service providers and when they ask me what kind of story to tell, I recommend a couple kinds:

    There’s “The Classic”: i.e.This is my passion and this is my business. Chances are, that you have the content for that video already. It’s what you talk about when you meet new people and introduce yourself.

    Blow a sample: And a note to reader: if you have any samples of your own, I’d love to feature it here and replace the below video!

    And here a video that talks about finding content for those kinds of videos:

    I also love any kind of expert tip series, especially if you are a service provider.

    For instance, I’m just finishing up a 22-video series “Nina’s Top Tips to Survive DIY Video Marketing“.

    Here the first video in that series:

    I was hugely worried about coming up with content, but once I found a chapter structure for the 22 videos, it was so easy to come up with expert tips, because I’m passionate about sharing my knowledge and helping small business owners.

    And, if you sell a product you can even do a tip series on that product: how to take care of it, use it, and work with it. Or you can talk about something related to the product.

    So, if your product is road biking gear, you could talk about bike maintenance tips, race training tips, and bike routes.

    No matter what kind of video you’re putting together, my advice is:

    • Keep it simple
    • Keep it short
    • Work with what you have
    • Stay clear of jargon
    • Be yourself, and
    • Have fun!

    What are your storytelling-challenges? I’d love to hear from you!

    Storytelling: Curated Link Pack

    1. How you speak to your audience is just as important as what you are saying. This brilliant blog post breaks down how Language, Tone, and Content all go into making an effective video… https://wistia.com/blog/successful-videos-respect-intelligence
    2. Do you love data and analytics? These seven successful companies do too. Plus, they all smartly use it to craft storytelling for their marketing… https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/data-driven-storytelling-brand-examples
    3. In video marketing, many lead with the solution and forget to set up the story. But the story is what is going to make your client connect to you and your business… https://wistia.com/blog/kindra-hall-strategic-storytelling
    4. Video lends itself to high impact (especially with today’s short attention spans). These videos prove you can create fantastic stories with only 6 seconds of content!… https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/marketing-resources/youtube-bumper-ads-six-second-storytelling/
    5. Strategic storytelling is just as important for a business’ sales team as it is for the business’ leader… https://blog.hubspot.com/sales/how-to-train-salespeople-to-tell-stories

    Storytelling For Video: Finding Consistent Content

    Happy Friday the 13th… I know it doesn’t mean anything, nor do I find the combination of a random day of the week paired with an equally as random number scary.

    What is however a tad scary, is that I entered into a 30-day video challenge.

    My challengers and I are all producing a video a (business) day for the month of October and posting daily to our YouTube channels. So that’s 22 videos in 30 days.

    I’ve survived videos one through 10 so far and have made some discoveries for myself. Notably:

    • Routine makes things easier (duh)
    • Organizing upfront pays off later (double duh)
    • Plans to re-invent the wheel (i.e. the video style) every week NOT going to happen if the task is 22 videos in 30 days and not winning a beauty contest.
    • Finding video content is the easiest part
    • If you’re sloppy with ANY step of shooting, organzing files, editing, rendering, and uploading to YouTube you’ll pay for it dearly during the following step(s)

    Here a link to video #8: Storytelling, Finding Content. Find out how super easy it is to get to content consistently!

    And, since you’re at it, please subscribe to my YouTube Channel!

    I have another challenge going with my nephew as to who will have more subscribers by the end of the year. And although, currently ahead of the curve, I don’t trust those digital natives. One viral video and I’m toast!

    Video Tech Specs:

    All videos are shot on my iPhone 7 with a Sennheiser clip-on microphone, edited on Adobe Premiere. The graphics are produced in Adobe Photoshop and then imported into Premiere.

    5 Things to Focus on When Storytelling for Video

    Created by Eightonesix – Freepik.com

    Scripting is the hardest part of the video marketing journey to get right and unfortunately the part you need to nail for the rest to fall into place. The rest being: Shooting, editing, distribution, and the desired outcome, like customer awareness, engagement, or conversion.

    I’ve written a lot about storytelling in general and what to look out for when crafting your message, but today I want to focus on Storytelling for video.

    I asked my friend, playwright, and corporate scriptwriter Joni Fritz about what she focuses on when writing for corporate video rather than writing for print, a speech, or (her passion) a play:

    “Print and video are definitely two different animals. I find when I’m writing narration for video, my sentences are shorter and more dramatic. I get to the point faster. I read everything aloud to make sure it flows off my tongue easily. Print can be easier and free-flowing. Longer sentences with more description. With video, I’m always trying to make things sharp and concise.”

    I find the hardest part of writing for video to be finding the balance between telling a compelling story and keeping it moving. I like to embellish and when I’m talking to someone in person I can lengthen or shorten a story as needed, taking cues from my listener’s body language.

    With video, you’re hoping for that captive audience hanging off your every word, but you have no feedback loop.

    I tend to err on the side of super short, then again, I also edit my own pieces and after the umpteenth time looking at myself and hearing the same thing I just want to cut it all…

    Over the past year, I’ve looked a hundreds and hundreds of videos produced by fellow small business owners and “internet sensations” and what the good videos have in common isn’t that they are perfectly produced, but rather a sense of authenticity. That is, they display energy, personality, sincerity, and a value proposition that resonates.

    Created by Freepik

    When you go for personality there will be those who are attracted by your (video) personality, and those who will not.

    But those in your audience who like you will really connect with you and your story and that’s what creates awareness, engagement, and ultimately converts them to customers.

    The worst choice is, to play it safe and consequently be bland and then no-one really cares. At that point, why bother with video?

    I hear, that when Gary Vee speaks, some people just roll their eyes and others soak up every word he utters.

    He has a distinct style. Take it or leave it, but he is himself and he gives valuable information with each piece of communication he puts out. He has a huge following. Why? He puts out great value with each piece of communication AND he’s got a personality to boot.

    Then there’s the incomparable Casey Neistat, filmmaker and YouTube sensation. Casey’s Vlog often exposes injustices, his videos are, fun, messy, and – although casual on the surface – very well produced. He’s real, authentic, energetic, and mesmerizing to watch.

    But, not everybody has a bubbly personality. Some quieter voices, like Roberto Blake will appeal to a different set of viewers and maybe at a different scale, but they are still out there and getting traction. I like that Roberto offers reliable, and solid advice on all things digital creation. He has a consistent, quiet but engaging way of roping you into his world. And his channel is growing by the day.

    Bottom line: Find YOUR voice, be friendly, and don’t forget to smile!

    So, since we’re at it – keep these 5 points in mind when planning and writing your video copy:

    1. Create VALUE with each communication you put out there
    1. Even if your video isn’t “teaching” something, make sure your video has depth and resonance. Give your viewers a chance to connect with you and what you stand for (or sell)
    1. Be clear who your audience is: Storytelling should lead to a single goal; which is yours?
      • Are you introducing yourself and your motivation for what you do?
      • Are you offering a special and talking about why the time to act is now?
      • Are you explaining a new feature or product and why it is superior?
    1. Plan to your strengths – I have a writer friend Michael Katz, who insists on doing screen-recordings and voice-over. That’s his thing. I think he would look great on-camera, but he’s chosen that style because it plays to his strengths and admittedly, he does have a great voice.

    For me, I’m a talker and I don’t mind being in front of the camera: And I produce my own footage without help, so I stick to talking-head videos and simple graphics (for now).

    1. I’ll never stop reminding you: Keep it short!

    Watch Nina’s VLOG on the topic

    And, here some inspiration beyond talking head videos:

    • Upgrade to 1st class documented by Casey Neistat: https://youtu.be/84WIaK3bl_s – Hysterical: And don’t be fooled – it’s expertly shot and edited

    • Liz Benny: https://youtu.be/KdDmamHTd9Y – DIY, super easy to reproduce. Just images, footage, music (although way too loud), graphics: “KAPOW” as Liz would say:

    CURATED LINK PACK:

    1. For good content to resonate, it needs to have depth, value and specificity and be supported by the right social media platform. Gary Vee asks: “What’s going on in the world you’re trying to be a part of? How can you insert yourself into the conversation?” https://www.garyvaynerchuk.com/one-piece-of-content-can-change-your-life/
    2. Writer, director, and master storyteller Andrew Stanton of Pixar Studios (Toy Story, WALL-E) examines in his TED talk the power of a great story. Listen to it and be inspired: https://www.ted.com/talks/andrew_stanton_the_clues_to_a_great_story/transcript?language=en
    3. Wistia makes a case for psychological tactics to catch and keep your audiences eye. It also includes useful examples of brands using those tactics: https://wistia.com/blog/using-psychology-for-video
    4. This Moz blog post is one of the best I’ve read so far on storytelling – no matter if the author focuses on web copy: It applies to video too: | Storytelling 301: Site Content as Story https://moz.com/blog/storytelling-site-content

    Video Content Within Context, or Why Sleeping with A Helmet Doesn’t Make Sense

    We all understand the words on the page, but sometimes SHOWING drives a message home. Here a modest example:

    For more words on Video Content and Context read our previous blog: Why It is Completely Irrelevant Which is More Important: Content or Context [updated with Curated Link Pack]

    I’m also — for the first time — adding production facts: What I shot with, how long it took me, what it cost me…

    Video Production Facts for Above Video:

    • Total Investment Summary: 4 hours, plus a few hours “content think” time, and $0
    • Camera: Shot on an iPhone 6 in selfie mode (lesser quality lens)
    • Audio: “Chair lift” scene: in-phone microphone. “Indoor” scene: Sennheiser mic (~ $200 Amazon)
    • Mount: “Chair lift” = handheld. “Indoor”: Joby mini tripod
    • Total shoot time: ~ 30 mins: Chair lift scene 3 mins (fingers froze ;-)). Indoor scene about 30 mins with prep and shoot.
    • Edit Software: Adobe Premiere CC
    • Graphics: Adobe Photoshop CC (templates I created beforehand)
    • Total edit & finishing time: 2 hours
    • Total upload & distribution time: 1.5 hours upload to YouTube, tagging, transcription, captioning, posting, distributing

    Why It Is Completely Irrelevant Which is More Important: Content or Context [updated with Curated Link Pack]

    Bill Gates famously quoted “Content is King” in 1996. Since, the quote has been altered so many times it’s hard to keep up: “Content is King and Context is God”, or “Content is King, and Context is Queen”, etc. The world has changed. In what relationship are content and context today?

    Maybe it’s the Swiss in me (we love consensus so much so we have seven ministers run the country), but I think there is no need for a “one over the other” in terms of importance. Neither content nor context survives without the other. Content and context are equally as important.

    Think of video marketing as a strategic board game where context drives content, and content excels within proper context.

    The most amazing content goes “poof” within the wrong context, and all the context in the world can’t save bad content. Period.

    Continue reading

    Continuous & Consistent Content: Three Companies Who Get it Done!

    In continuing with our blog: The Three Must Have “C’s” Without Which no Video Marketing Campaign Will be Successfulwe set out to see who does continuous and consistent video marketing content well.

    Herewith our three top choices (and we’d love to hear from you with more examples!):

    Combs & Company, Insurance Broker:

    Susan Combs, CEO of Combs & Company, has an extensive video library; from CEO interviews, to white board explainers, and meeting coverage.

    What’s interesting is, that she has all her video series bulk-produced. This not only saves time and money, it also gives the videos a look-, tone-, and content continuity that speaks to the commitment she has made to being a likable expert in her field.

    It’s sets her apart from her competition, opens doors far beyond pulling in additional leads. Have a look at her different video series and you’ll get the picture.

    JacksonFuller Real Estate:

    Matt Fuller of JacksonFuller Real Estate and his residential real-estate team of five started blogging in 2006 and video was always on their radar but never used consistently until last fall. But then they went all out. Check out their Vimeo channel.

    They produce the videos themselves and they quickly found out that “keep it simple” is the key ingredient. I’m amazed they figured out the green screen over editing!

    They have a good mix of funny, light, and seriously informative content, and it’s consistent!

    Boutique Accounting Services:

    Richard Greco, founder and owner of Boutique Accounting Service does a great job with his videos. I love the clean, white background and the simple but elegant graphics. I’m still not a fan of side-angle shooting for a second camera, but it makes it easier to edit content.

    I just wish I could a) embed his videos here and b) he had not announced (scroll all the way down on the link given below) all these other videos to come in 2016… It’s 2017, dude. I hope he continues.

    Who do YOU KNOW who does video marketing well? We are looking to interview (for a quick 15 minutes) companies that are engaging in video marketing regularly to help us develop and fine-tune our video marketing services for small businesses. Any help is much appreciated.

    Explainer Video: Curated Link Picks

    Happy Summer! The dog days of summer are the perfect time to keep your video marketing knowledge growing. Below some interesting links to peruse: Some to learn “how to”, and some to see “how not to”…

    • Explainer videos have become essential teaching tools for products and services, learn why with Why You Need An Explainer Video for Your Business.

      Note: Ignore the animation reference for explainer videos: Cheap platform based animation models look, well, cheap… Focus instead on content and shooting it live. (And if you MUST have animated: go with a pro who will cut you a deal. I can help you find the right one).

    • Need some inspiration for the kind of Explainer Video you do NOT want to make? Check out Explainer Videos – The Best of the Best. I’m not being cynical: These videos are visually not appealing, slow moving, and formulaic. You can do better.

    • Now that you’re inspired, figure out what you want to say with 5 Steps to Scripting Great Microlearning Videos.

    • Need some inspiration how you want your Explainer Video to look like? Check out the websites of these 10 top companies in the US: 10 Best Explainer Video Production Firms, August 2016. Here direct links to videos (and still, I’m not a fan of animation…)
      1. http://bigdropinc.com/services/animated-videos/
      2. https://www.socialfix.com/project-attributes/video/ – my second fave
      3. http://simplestoryvideos.com/portfolio/ – my favorite

    Sold on creating an Explainer Video but want help figuring out how to use your own tools to make one? Contact us at 212-343-3099 or info@clockwiseproductions.com, so we can talk about how we can guide you to the fastest video marketing success for your business.

    Some Thoughts on Hiring a Copywriter for Video Content

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe all write – most of us actually quite a lot, between emails, newsletters, content creation, text messages, and social media posts.

    As we search for our business’ stories and best ways to share them, I wanted to call attention to the mechanism of actually WRITING down those stories. My advice throughout has been (and still is), that there are two positions to consider filling with professionals even if you’re totally bootstrapping your video marketing efforts: From a creative perspective a writer (also called CD: creative director, or copywriter), and from a technical point of view, an editor (who, incidentally also is a copy-editor, fining the story in the footage you shot. Continue reading